Landon Carter’s Uneasy Kingdom: Revolution and Rebellion on a Virginia Plantation

#ad
Oxford University Press #ad - Moreover, a figure of shakespearean proportions, in this presentation of Landon Carter's passionate narratives, the diarist becomes an arresting new character in the world's literature, the Lear of his own tragic kingdom. Landon carter, a virginia planter, left behind one of the most revealing of all American diaries.

His diary, originally a record of plantation business, began to fill with angry stories of revolt in his own little kingdom. In this astonishingly rich biography, Isaac mines this remarkable document--and many other sources--to reconstruct Carter's interior world as it plunged into revolution. The aging patriarch, though a fierce supporter of American liberty, was deeply troubled by the rebellion and its threat to established order.

Landon Carter's Uneasy Kingdom: Revolution and Rebellion on a Virginia Plantation #ad - Not only had landon's king betrayed his subjects, but Landon's own household betrayed him: his son showed insolent defiance, his daughter Judith eloped with a forbidden suitor, all of his slaves conspired constantly, and eight of them made an armed exodus to freedom. This long-awaited work will be seen both as a major contribution to Revolution history and a triumph of the art of biography.

Carter writes at white heat, his words sputtering from his pen as he documents the terrible rupture that the Revolution meant to him. The seismic upheaval he helped to start had crumbled the foundations of Carter's own home. In landon carter's uneasy kingdom Rhys Isaac unfolds not only the life, but also the mental world of our countrymen in a long-distant time.

Indeed, carter felt in his heart that he was chronicling a world in decline, the passing of the order that his revered father had bequeathed to him.

#ad



The First Emancipator: The Forgotten Story of Robert Carter, the Founding Father Who Freed His Slaves

#ad
Random House #ad - Robert carter iii, the grandson of tidewater legend Robert “King” Carter, was born into the highest circles of Virginia’s Colonial aristocracy. He was neighbor and kin to the Washingtons and Lees and a friend and peer to Thomas Jefferson and George Mason. In an era of empty anglican piety, Carter experienced a feverish religious visionthat impelled him to help build a church where blacks and whites were equals.

. Why did this troubled, spiritually torn man dare to do what far more visionary slave owners only dreamed of? In answering this question, Andrew Levy teases out the very texture of Carter’s life and soul–the unspoken passions that divided him from others of his class, and the religious conversion that enabled him to see his black slaves in a new light.

Drawing on years of painstaking research, written with grace and fire, The First Emancipator is a portrait of an unsung hero who has finally won his place in American history. In a document he called his deed of gift, carter declared his intent to set free nearly five hundred slaves in the largest single act of liberation in the history of American slavery before the Emancipation Proclamation.

How did carter succeed in the very action that george washington and thomas jefferson claimed they fervently desired but were powerless to effect? And why has his name all but vanished from the annals of American history? In this haunting, Andrew Levy traces the confluence of circumstance, conviction, brilliantly original work, war, and passion that led to Carter’s extraordinary act.

The First Emancipator: The Forgotten Story of Robert Carter, the Founding Father Who Freed His Slaves #ad - At the dawn of the revolutionary war, carter was one of the wealthiest men in America, factories, the owner of tens of thousands of acres of land, ironworks–and hundreds of slaves. It is an astonishing, challenging, and ultimately inspiring book. But on september 5, 1791, carter severed his ties with this glamorous elite at the stroke of a pen.

#ad



Cheap Amusements

#ad
Temple University Press #ad - Cheap amusements argues that a crucial part of the "reorientation of American culture" originated from below, specifically in the subculture of working women to be found in urban dance halls and amusement resorts. What did young, independent women do for fun and how did they pay their way into New York City's turn-of-the-century pleasure places? Cheap Amusements is a fascinating discussion of young working women whose meager wages often fell short of bare subsistence and rarely allowed for entertainment expenses.

Kathy peiss follows working women into saloons, dance halls, social clubs, Coney Island amusement parks, and nickelodeons to explore the culture of these young women between 1880 and 1920 as expressed in leisure activities. Not only does her analysis lead us to new insights into working-class culture, changing social relations between single men and women, and urban courtship, but it also gives us a fuller understanding of the cultural transformations that gave rise to the commercialization of leisure.

Cheap Amusements #ad - The early twentieth century witnessed the emergence of "heterosocial companionship" as a dominant ideology of gender, affirming mixed-sex patterns of social interaction, in contrast to the nineteenth century's segregated spheres. By examining the rituals and styles they adopted and placing that culture in the larger context of urban working-class life, she offers us a complex picture of the dynamics shaping a working woman's experience and consciousness at the turn-of-the-century.

#ad



The Transformation of Virginia, 1740-1790 Published by the Omohundro Institute of Early American History and Culture and the University of North Carolina Press

#ad
Omohundro Institute and University of North Carolina Press #ad - In this pulitzer prize-winning book, Rhys Isaac describes and analyzes the dramatic confrontations--primarily religious and political--that transformed Virginia in the second half of the eighteenth century. Making use of the observational techniques of the cultural anthropologist, Isaac vividly recreates and painstakingly dissects a society in the turmoil of profound inner change.

#ad



Entertaining Satan: Witchcraft and the Culture of Early New England

#ad
Oxford University Press #ad - In the first edition of the bancroft Prize-winning Entertaining Satan, John Putnam Demos presented an entirely new perspective on American witchcraft. He provides a new preface that puts forth a broader overview of witchcraft and looks at its place around the world--from ancient times right up to the present.

. By investigating the surviving historical documents of over a hundred actual witchcraft cases, he vividly recreated the world of New England during the witchcraft trials and brought to light fascinating information on the role of witchcraft in early American culture. Now demos has revisited his original work and updated it to illustrate why these early Americans' strange views on witchcraft still matter to us today.

#ad



James Henry Hammond and the Old South: A Design for Mastery Southern Biography Series

#ad
LSU Press #ad - Like faulkner’s thomas sutpen, faust suggests, Hammond had a “design, ” a compulsion to direct every moment of his life toward self-aggrandizement and legitimation. But these goals were also beyond his control. Of humble origins, hammond set out to conquer his society, to make himself a leader and a spokesman for the Old South.

But in reality, his slaves, neither his family, nor even his own behavior was completely under his command. Through marriage he acquired a large plantation and many slaves, and then through shrewd management and progressive farming techniques he soon became one of the wealthiest men in South Carolina. A scandal over his personal life forced him to retreat for many years to his plantation, but eventually he returned to public view, winning a seat in the United States Senate that he resigned when South Carolina seceded from the Union.

James henry Hammond’s ambition was unquenchable. Planter, politician, and partisan of slavery, Hammond built a career for himself that in its breadth and ambition provides a composite portrait of the civilization in which he flourished. A long-awaited biography, drew gilpin faust’s James Henry Hammond and the Old South reveals the South Carolina planter who was at once characteristic of his age and unique among men of his time.

James Henry Hammond and the Old South: A Design for Mastery Southern Biography Series #ad - From his birth in 1807 to his death in 1864 as sherman’s troops marched in triumph toward South Carolina, James Henry Hammond witnessed the rise and fall of the cotton kingdom of the Old South. He was elected to the United States House of Representatives and served as governor of his state. At the time of his death it had become clear to him that his world, the world of the Old South, had ended.

#ad



A Midwife's Tale: The Life of Martha Ballard, Based on Her Diary, 1785-1812

#ad
Vintage #ad - Winner of the pulitzer prizedrawing on the diaries of one woman in eighteenth-century Maine, religious rivalries, household economies, this intimate history illuminates the medical practices, and sexual mores of the New England frontier. Between 1785 and 1812 a midwife and healer named martha Ballard kept a diary that recorded her arduous work in 27 years she attended 816 births as well as her domestic life in Hallowell, Maine.

On the basis of that diary, laurel thatcher Ulrich gives us an intimate and densely imagined portrait, not only of the industrious and reticent Martha Ballard but of her society. At once lively and impeccably scholarly, A Midwife's Tale is a triumph of history on a human scale.

#ad



Thomas Jefferson's Education

#ad
W. W. Norton & Company #ad - Jefferson’s hopes of developing an enlightened leadership for the state were disappointed, and Virginia hardened its commitment to slavery in the coming years. The university was born with the flaws of a slave society. Devoted to the education of his granddaughters, he nevertheless accepted their subordination in a masculine culture.

It offers an incisive portrait of thomas Jefferson set against a social fabric of planters in decline, enslaved black families torn apart by sales, and a hair-trigger code of male honor. A man of “deft evasions” who was both courtly and withdrawn, Jefferson sought control of his family and state from his lofty perch at Monticello.

Thomas Jefferson's Education #ad - His intention was a university to educate the sons of Virginia’s wealthy planters, and merchants, lawyers, who might then democratize the state and in time rid it of slavery. Never quite the egalitarian we wish him to be, he advocated emancipation but shrank from implementing it, entrusting that reform to the next generation.

Opening in 1825, the enslaved servants, the university nearly collapsed as unruly students abused one another, and the faculty. But the university’s students, having absorbed the traditional vices of the Virginia gentry, preferred to practice and defend them. From a pulitzer prize–winning historian comes a brilliant, absorbing study of Thomas Jefferson’s campaign to save Virginia through education.

By turns entertaining and tragic, this beautifully written history reveals the origins of a great university in the dilemmas of Virginia slavery. Instead, it was jefferson’s beloved granddaughters who carried forward his faith in education by becoming dedicated teachers of a new generation of women.

#ad



Defending Slavery: Proslavery Thought in the Old South: A Brief History with Documents The Bedford Series in History and Culture

#ad
Bedford/St. Martin's #ad - Nationally, it was protected by the U. S. Constitution, federal laws, and Supreme Court decisions, and slaveowners dominated all three branches of the federal government. The volume also includes a chronology, a selected bibliography, and illustrations. This body of thought—based on religion, politics and law, economics, expediency, history, philosophy, and science—offers invaluable insights into how slavery shaped American history and continues to affect American society.

His headnotes supply a rich context for each reading. Slavery, however, was entrenched in the South and remained integral to American politics and culture. Within decades of the american Revolution, the Northern states had either ended slavery or provided for its gradual abolition. From the time of the revolution until the Civil War and beyond, Southern thinkers offered a variety of proslavery arguments.

Defending Slavery: Proslavery Thought in the Old South: A Brief History with Documents The Bedford Series in History and Culture #ad - . In this volume, paul finkelman presents a representative selection of proslavery thought and includes an introduction that explores the history of slavery and the debate over it.

#ad



Scraping By: Wage Labor, Salvery, and Survival in Early Baltimore Studies in Early American Economy and Society from the Library Company of Philadelphia

#ad
Johns Hopkins University Press #ad - Seth rockman considers this diverse workforce, exploring how race, sex, nativity, and legal status determined the economic opportunities and vulnerabilities of working families in the early republic. In the era of frederick douglass, Baltimore's distinctive economy featured many slaves who earned wages and white workers who performed backbreaking labor.

Rockman's research includes construction site payrolls, court petitions, employment advertisements, almshouse records, and the nation's first "living wage" campaign. Rockman argues that the American working class emerged from the everyday struggles of these low-wage workers. Their labor was indispensable to the early republic's market revolution, and it was central to the transformation of the United States into the wealthiest society in the Western world.

He also explores what happened if they failed to find work or lost their jobs. These rich accounts of day laborers and domestic servants illuminate the history of early republic capitalism and its consequences for working families. Rockman describes the material experiences of low-wage workers -- how they found work, fuel, translated labor into food, and rent, and navigated underground economies and social welfare systems.

Scraping By: Wage Labor, Salvery, and Survival in Early Baltimore Studies in Early American Economy and Society from the Library Company of Philadelphia #ad - Enslaved mariners, free black domestic servants, white seamstresses, Irish dockhands, and native-born street sweepers all navigated the low-end labor market in post-Revolutionary Baltimore. By focusing his study on this boomtown, Rockman reassesses the roles of race and region and rewrites the history of class and capitalism in the United States during this time.

#ad



The Making of a Dream: How a group of young undocumented immigrants helped change what it means to be American

#ad
Harper #ad - A journalist chronicles the next chapter in civil rights—the story of a movement and a nation, witnessed through the poignant and inspiring experiences of five young undocumented activists who are transforming society’s attitudes toward one of the most contentious political matters roiling America today: immigration.

They are called the dreamers: young people who were brought, or sent, to the United States as children and who have lived for years in America without legal status. Their quest for permanent legal protection under the so-called "Dream Act, " stalled. The immigrants’ coming of age stories intersect with the watershed political and economic events of the last two decades: 9/11, the recession, the Obama presidency, the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, and the rebirth of the anti-immigrant right.

In telling their story, laura Wides-Muñoz forces us to rethink our definition of what it means to be American. Growing up, they often worked hard in school, in the eyes of the United States government and many citizens, only to learn they were, planned for college, "illegal aliens. Determined to take fate into their own hands, engineering a seismic shift in public opinion on immigration, a group of these young undocumented immigrants risked their safety to "come out" about their status—sparking a transformative movement, and inspiring other social movements across the country.

The Making of a Dream: How a group of young undocumented immigrants helped change what it means to be American #ad - But in 2012, new immigration policy: deferred action for childhood Arrivals, the Obama administration issued a landmark, or DACA, which has since protected more than half a million young immigrants from deportation even as efforts to install more expansive protections remain elusive. The making of a dream begins at the turn of the millennium, and undocumented immigrants themselves, with the first of a series of "Dream Act" proposals; follows the efforts of policy makers, activists, and concludes with the 2016 presidential election and the first months of the Trump presidency.

#ad